You hear references sometimes, many conjuring up images of toothless old geezers sitting on their rocking chairs, complaining about how they can tell a storms a-comin’. They can feel it in their bones.

Much has been written about possible connections between pain and weather – just do a quick google search on “pain and weather” – and there isn’t much agreement. There is some suggestion that barometric pressure, or particularly rapid changes in weather, are a strong indicator for increased pain. Still, it varies from patient to patient.

I haven’t researched this extensively lately – my main sources at this point are a 1995 N.Y. Times article and a Weather Channel article on Aches & Pains 101. Admittedly not the most reliable or exhaustive study. I would search more, except I’m recovering from a migraine that means that looking at the computer screen for too long makes me slightly queasy. Scratch that – I feel slightly queasy anyway. Of course, reading a mystery novel set in the practically tempest-filled Dartmoor, England probably didn’t help. (The book is quite good, though.)

I just started a new pain journal – more on that in another post – and have been tracking weather patterns, as well as things such as exercise, sleep, food, and of course pain.

What does today’s flare-up indicate? Inconclusive at this point.

The most I can point to is that it was an unfortunate conflation of triggers. I didn’t sleep until 3 am, and got up at noon. Spending so much time in bed hurt, and I forgot part of my previous night’s medication. It was bright and windy outside, and I had chocolate (a known migraine trigger). True, the barometric pressure changed rapidly – dropping from 29.96 inches Friday to 29.69 Saturday, then increasing today to the 30.11 range. (I use averages for simplicity.)

Is it the pressure? The chocolate? The sleep patterns? Or some nebulous interaction?

One data point amidst four days of symptom tracking doth not a pattern make. It does strengthen my commitment to keeping a pain log, to see what I might find.

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